Restoration

The twenty-first century has seen the introduction of  the LEED  ( Leading Energy and Environmental Design) concepts and which many times confict with historic preservation ethics. There is an effort to make the old buildings meet the energy requirements with out destroying the historic architecture.  The environmental regulations effect the openings in every structure and are one  of the major energy saving factors used to calculate the construction of the The twenty-first century has seen the introduction of  the LEED  ( Leading Energy and Environmental Design) concepts and which many times confict with historic preservation ethics. There is an effort to make the old buildings meet the energy requirements with out destroying the historic architecture.  The environmental regulations effect the openings in every structure and are one  of the major energy saving factors used to calculate the construction of the building.   The Historical value of windows is an important part of any historic resource.     Windows are the most visible, yet most commonly underappreciated, components of older and historic homes and buildings.

In addition to adding beauty and character, original windows serve a great purpose — they connect the outside of the building to the inside and, as an integral part of the architecture, offer invaluable clues to a building’s history. Despite this value, however, historic windows often get the blame for a building’s energy loss. Most often, people jump to replace their historic windows because a) companies promise that their replacement windows will save clients time and money, and b) it’s promoted as the “green” thing to do. In fact, a thriving industry has grown around this perceived need to replace rather than restore.

The latest report from our Preservation Green Lab in Seattle, Saving Windows, Saving Money: Evaluating the Energy Performance of Window Retrofit and Replacement, tackles this unfortunate perception head-on. The study examines multiple ways you can retrofit (read: modify) your historic windows for better performance, and outlines each option’s energy, carbon, and cost savings across a variety of climates.

The heartening result: Retrofits for historic windows perform comparably to new replacement windows, and almost every retrofit option offers a better return on investment (at a fraction of the cost).

For more facts and figures, we encourage you to read the full Preservation Green Lab report. In the meantime, check out the top 10 things you should know about retrofitting your historic windows.    Windows are the most visible, yet most commonly underappreciated, components of older and historic homes and buildings.

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